SAY Soccer is here in Vinton County!  The Soccer Association for Youth (SAY) was formed to provide an organization so children could learn and play soccer. The fact that any size player can be successful at the game and there is only a modest expense required to field a team, make it possible for many children to participate in organized competition around the world.

• Home •
• Vinton County Soccer -Warm Ups •
• Vinton County Soccer -3 Great Fakes •
• Vinton County Soccer -Goal Keeping for Ages 5-9 •
• Goal Keeping for Ages 10-14 •
• How To Pass •
• Shielding •
• Basic Field Play •
• How to kick a football •
• How To Dribble •

Vinton County Ohio Soccer Association for Youth

How to teach the basic push pass

with selections from  Soccer-Coach-L handbook

 

Inside of the Foot Pass

The instep or push pass is a common pass used in soccer. To do a push pass, you use the inside of the foot (along the arch) to push the ball forward. As a result, the hip and leg/knee must rotate outwards to allow contact with the ball. Taking these elements in sequence, you will:

1.      Turn the pass foot outward, locking the ankle so that the foot will not wobble. The knee of the passing leg will be slightly bent to allow the foot to come into contact with the middle of the ball.

2.      As you are turning the pass foot outward, you will be stepping up to the ball with your plant foot, so that it is about hip-width away from the ball. If you stand too close, your hip will not swing smoothly. If you stand too far to the side, your angle will be awkward and the ball will not be struck smoothly. Your plant leg should be slightly bent, and the toe of the plant foot should be pointed at the target.

3.      The ball is struck in the middle. If struck towards the bottom, it will go airborne. As the ball is struck, the plant leg should continue thru a natural swing of the hip, which will transfer additional power to the pass and also help to make it more accurate.

4.      The arms will be held somewhat out from the body, especially on the follow-thru, so improve balance.

Preparation

1.      Face target

2.      Plant balance (non-kicking) foot beside ball

3.      Point balance foot toward target

4.      Square shoulders and hips to target

5.      Flex balance leg slightly at knee

6.      Swing kicking leg backward

7.      Position kicking foot sideways

8.      Arms out to sides for balance

9.      Head steady

10.  Focus on the ball

Execution

1.      Body over the ball

2.      Swing kicking leg forward

3.      Keep kicking foot firm

4.      Contact center of ball with inside surface of foot

Follow-Through

1.      Transfer weight forward

2.      Generate momentum through ball

3.      Smooth follow-through and point your toes up and away from the midline of your body. Contact the center of the ball with the inside surface of your kicking foot. Make sure that your foot is firmly positioned as you follow through with the kicking motion

 

The push pass can be learned by most children by around age 8-9. Short children (because the ball is relatively large) may have difficulty with this pass, as they may have insufficient hip width or swing to be able to get enough power. Children under age 8 often do not have the balance/coordination to use this pass, and may do better with a laces pass (passing the ball by pointing the toe down and hitting it along the big arch bone which along the side of the shoe laces).


 

 

 

 

Symptom

Correction

Poor accuracy Plant your balance foot beside the ball and pointed toward the target.

Square hips and shoulders.

Keep your head steady as you contact the ball.

Pass lacks velocity or pace. Keep kicking foot firm.

Transfer your weight forward as the kicking foot contacts the ball.

Use a smooth follow-through motion.

You approach the ball from a severe angle Approach from directly behind the ball and attempt to kick across your body.

Square shoulders and hips to target as your foot contacts the ball.

Pass in the direction you are facing.

Outside-of-the-Foot Pass

At times you will have to release a pass while dribbling at speed; at other times you may want to pass the ball diagonally to the right or left. For these situations the outside-of-the-foot pass is your best choice.

This technique involves an element of deception and is less predictable to opponents than the inside-of- the-foot pass. Use the outside-of-the foot technique for short- and medium-distance passes. Plant your balance foot slightly behind and to the side of the ball. Extend the kicking foot down and rotate it slightly inward. Use an inside-out kicking motion as you contact the inside half of the ball with the outside surface of your instep. Keep your foot firmly positioned. For passing distances of 5 to 10 yards, use a short, snap-like kicking motion of the lower leg. For longer passes use a more complete follow-through to generate greater distance and velocity

Preparation

1.      Plant balance foot slightly behind and to side of ball

2.      Point balance foot forward

3.      Flex balance leg at knee

4.      Swing kicking leg back behind balance leg

5.      Extend kicking foot downward and rotate inward

6.      Arms out to sides for balance

7.      Head steady

8.      Focus on the ball

 

Execution

1.      Head down and body over ball

2.      Snap kicking leg forward

3.      Keep kicking foot firmly positioned

4.      Contact ball on outside surface of instep

5.      Contact inside half of ball

Follow-Through

1.      Transfer weight forward

2.      Use an inside-out kicking motion

3.      Complete follow-through of the kicking leg

 

 

Symptom

Correction

Ball leaves the ground. Plant your balance foot slightly behind and to the side of the ball. Your kicking foot should be pointed down and rotated inward with your knee over the ball at the moment of contact. Do not lean back. Keep your head steady and focus on the ball.
Pass lacks velocity or pace. Keep the kicking foot firm and use a short, powerful snap-like motion of the kicking leg.

Contact the ball with as much foot surface area as possible.

For longer passes use a complete follow-through motion of the kicking leg.

Too much spin on the ball. Contact the ball just left or right of its vertical midline, not along its outer edge.

 

Instep Pass

Use the instep pass to play the ball when the distance is 25 yards or greater. The instep is the portion of your foot covered by the shoe laces. It provides a hard, flat surface with which to contact the ball. To execute the instep pass, approach the ball from a slight angle. Plant your balance foot beside the ball with the leg slightly flexed. Square your hips and shoulders to the intended target. As you draw back. the kicking leg, extend and firmly position the kicking foot. Keep your head steady and focus on the ball. Use a complete follow-through motion as you drive your instep through the point of contact with the ball. The kicking mechanics are very similar to those used when shooting

Preparation

1.      Approach ball from behind at slight angle

2.      Plant balance foot beside ball

3.      Point balance foot toward target

4.      Flex balance leg at knee

5.      Square shoulders and hips to target

6.      Draw back kicking leg

7.      Kicking foot extended and firm

8.      Knee of kicking leg over ball

9.      Arms out to sides for balance

10.  Head steady

11.  Focus on the ball

Execution

1.      Transfer weight forward

2.      Powerful snap-like motion of kicking leg

3.      Kicking foot firm

4.      Contact the center of the ball with instep

Follow-Through

1.      Generate momentum through the ball

2.      Weight centered over ball of balance foot

3.      Follow-through to chest level

 

  

 

 

 

 Vinton County Soccer Home   Vinton County Soccer Guidelines

Vinton County Soccer Schedule

• Home •

 

All content 2004 Vinton County Soccer Association for Youth.
A Non-Profit Organization  Site Design: 21 Crows Productions